The Role of Antimicrobial Copper Surfaces in Reducing Healthcare-associated Infections

The Role of Antimicrobial Copper Surfaces in Reducing Healthcare-associated Infections

Recent work investigating the antimicrobial characteristics of copper has led to a re-evaluation of the role of this essential metal in healthcare.
While ancient civilisations used copper for its health benefits it seems its usefulness has been forgotten. The requirement for evidence-based
interventions for infection control has been the driver behind recent scientific assessments of the benefits of copper. Ten years of laboratory
research has led to clinical trials confirming a very significant and continuous reduction in environmental bioburden in a number of healthcare settings globally. The newest and most comprehensive clinical research has now reported an impressive 40 % reduction in healthcare-associated infections in intensive care units (ICUs) where copper was incorporated in key touch surfaces. The deployment of copper touch surfaces should be considered as an additional infection control measure to reduce care costs and improve bed availability and patient outcomes.

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The Role of Antimicrobial Copper Surfaces in Reducing Healthcare-associated Infections

Sustained Reduction of Microbial Burden on Common Hospital Surfaces

Michael G. Schmidt,a Hubert H. Attaway,a Peter A. Sharpe, b Joseph John, Jr., c Kent A. Sepkowitz,d Andrew Morgan,a Sarah E. Fairey,a Susan Singh,d Lisa L. Steed,e J. Robert Cantey,f Katherine D. Freeman,g Harold T. Michels,h and Cassandra D. Salgadof Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Charleston, South Carolina, USAa; Irwin P. Sharpe and Associates, West Orange, New
Jersey, USAb; Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, South Carolina, USAc; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, New York, New York, USAd; Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Charleston, South Carolina, USAe; Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Charleston, South Carolina, USAf; Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and & Population Health, Bronx, New York, USAg; and Copper Development Association, New York, New York, USAh

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